Posted in News Article

Sam Ortega: The U.S. Has Always Exploited Immigrants During Pandemics

Rising junior History major Sam Ortega authored this piece in YES! Magazine, exploring the treatment of migrants at the border in her home town of El Paso across two pandemics: the 1917 typhus outbreak and our current COVID-19 outbreak. Sam had originally researched the 1917 typhus epidemic in “World Migration” with Professor Jose Moya, and returned to the topic this spring for an op-ed assignment in “Seeking Asylum” with Professor Nara Milanich. You can read the full, compelling article through the link below!

Posted in Blog Post

One Recipe for a Delicious Thesis: Taking a Hands-On Approach to Cookbook Research

Recent Barnard history graduate Ally McDonough writes about how a centuries-old recipe inspired her to conduct some field research in the kitchen for her senior thesis on dairy farming and the use of dairy in Northern Indian recipes before and during the colonial eras and make her own Halwa at home.

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Posted in Blog Post

Seeking Asylum Course Explores Themes of Immigration and Asylum, with Visit to Detention Center on US-Mexico Border

In a pilot course this past Spring, students in HIST3670, Seeking Asylum, partnered with the Dilley Pro Bono Project (DPBP) to provide aid to mothers and children in detention centers along the US-Mexico Border. The course, taught by professor Nara Milanich, explored the history of immigration and asylum in the United States, with the trip to Texas being taken over Spring Break. In an interview, students discussed their experiences in the course and the value of this model of learning.

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